MTalks
WE’VE DECLARED A CLIMATE EMERGENCY, NOW WHAT THE F**K DO WE DO?

Free!

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Real impacts of climate change are being felt the world over. The scale and urgency of action required has resulted in local governments and other organisations across Australia starting to see climate change as an emergency. Nothing matters more than what we do next.

Meaningful action requires integrated, transformational change, both to reduce emissions and to respond to the impacts of climate change, such as increased flooding, rising sea levels, drought, extreme heatwaves and more bushfires.

Many organisations already have in place either carbon reduction plans for their own operations and many local governments a community climate change strategy. So why have so many taken the next step to declare a climate emergency, and how does this declaration prompt a more urgent response? How are things different post declaration?

Join sustainability-oriented group, HIP V. HYPE, and Proud Mary Consulting as we seek to learn from a panel of experts and explore the role local government and other organisations can play in mobilising communities, accelerating action and ensuring we move beyond symbolic declaration, toward material impacts in the fight against climate change.

This event is made possible by the Hugh D T Williamson Foundation through funding for MPavilion’s Design & Science series of events.

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Wominjeka (Welcome). We acknowledge the Yaluk-ut Weelam as the traditional custodians of the land on which we meet. Yaluk-ut Weelam means ‘people of the river camp’ and is connected with the coastal land at the head of Port Phillip Bay, extending from the Werribee River to Mordialloc. The Yaluk-ut Weelam are part of the Boon Wurrung, one of the five major language groups of the greater Kulin Nation. We pay our respects to the land, their ancestors and their elders—past, present and to the future.