MTalks
The Work of Architectural Work

MPavilion

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Peggy Deamer, Professor of Architecture at Yale University and principal in the firm of Deamer, Architects, founded The Architecture Lobby in 2013 to advocate for the value of architectural design and labor.

As a decentralised network of groups across the United States, The Architecture Lobby aims to tackle the underpayment of architecture staff, the exploitation of student architects, and the lack of a representative fee system for architectural practice in general.

Now, The Architecture Lobby has a Melbourne chapter, the first outside the United States. Established in 2019, the Victorian contingent advocates for architectural workers at all levels: graduates, registered architects, working students, interns, academics, landscape architects, interior designers and draftspeople, and their right to inclusive, equitable and flexible working conditions.

Presented in collaboration with Melbourne School of Design, MPavilion is excited to welcome Professor Peggy Deamer to discuss her work on the project thus far. Deamer will look at the problematic way that we understand architectural work, interrogate the institutions that currently define that work, and examine how activism – research, action, and performance-based – can redirect that work.

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Wominjeka (Welcome). We acknowledge the Yaluk-ut Weelam as the traditional custodians of the land on which we meet. Yaluk-ut Weelam means ‘people of the river camp’ and is connected with the coastal land at the head of Port Phillip Bay, extending from the Werribee River to Mordialloc. The Yaluk-ut Weelam are part of the Boon Wurrung, one of the five major language groups of the greater Kulin Nation. We pay our respects to the land, their ancestors and their elders—past, present and to the future.